Walk the footsteps of the soldiers who fought on the Flodden Battle field almost 500 years ago.

Today, in the quiet fields and rolling hills around the small village of Branxton it is difficult to believe that 500 years ago this was the scene of one of the bloodiest battles ever to take place in the British Isles. Soldiers came from all parts of Scotland and England to line up in two great armies facing each other across the shallow valley just to the south of Branxton. It was here that a great artillery duel opened the last medieval battle, where men fought hand to hand and 14,000 died within the space of a few hours - a rate of slaughter that compares with some of the worst days of the Battle of the Somme in the First World War.

It was here too that a King, James IV of Scotland, became the last monarch to die in battle in the British Isles and the course of history of two nations was changed.

The Flodden Battlefield Trail, an award-winning trail created and maintained by the Remembering Flodden Project (a registered charity) covers the ground where the two armies met in combat and detailed interpretation boards assist the visitor in visualising the events of the 9th September 1513. The boards describe the manoeuvers and tactics of the Battle and provide illustrations of the weapons and armour of the times. They explain the importance of the topography and ground conditions and how the tide of battle ebbed and flowed for the two opposing armies.

The local church, St Paul’s at Branxton, is also well worth visiting to see the records and notes taken from the battle. Large scale burial pits were dug in the vicinity.

Perhaps the last word should go to an 8 year old visitor who had a great time when she visited the battlefield. “I visited the site with my mum and dad today and really, really enjoyed it...I liked the picture boards all the way round. I could imagine the mud and the noise when the battle happened. I like to imagine what ancient things are buried deep in the ground!!!”

Free and open access to the battlefield site throughout the year. Flodden Battlefield is the core site of the Flodden 1513 Ecomuseum, established to commemorate the quincentenary of the battle in 2013.

Published in What to do

Come to fish the River Till on the beautiful Ford & Etal Estates waters in rural North Northumberland.

The River Till is England’s only tributary of the mighty River Tweed; as such it is governed by River Tweed fishing regulations. It is particularly well-known for its run of sea-trout from the spring to summer month but grilse and salmon are also regularly taken, as are grayling during winter months.

Night fishing is available during the summer months amidst this beautiful section of the river, in parts graded a Site of Special Scientific Interest.

Under Tweed Rules you are allowed to fish fly, worm or spinner. Fly rods should be about 11 feet and generally single handed will suffice. Floating lines are best for summer, sometimes with a sink-tip. Spring and Autumn, sinking lines are useful.

In most instances wading is either not necessary or not possible, though in the summer months it may be useful when night fishing. Maps are provided and advice and even flies/lures are offered to visiting anglers.

Occasionally canoeists may be encountered - they have a right of passage and we would ask that fishermen afford them every courtesty.

Fishing permits for the Ford Beat can be urchased from Ford Post Office, The Estate Office or The Northern Trader in Milfield.  Bookings and payments can also be made through Fishpal or by telephone on 01573 470612 (office hours only, Mon-Fri 9am-5pm).

The image below is a sample of the maps that are available:

fishing-map

There are four main beats:

Redscar: This beat lies in the Milfield plain south of Redscar Bridge near Milfield Village and is a very easy beat to fish, with good access and level walks on the river bank. It runs to 1.5 miles with 15 named pools which are long and deep (4 to 8 feet) but are not fast running, comprising of glides.

Upper Tindal: The Upper Tindal beat runs downstream of Etal Village with over 1.5 miles and 16 pools and is where the nature of the Till changes, becoming much faster-flowing over rock with white water streams into deep pools, creating ideal fly water. This stretch is fished from the left bank with limited access to the heavily-wooded right bank. A single handed fly rod will cover the pools. The beat is let day or night from May to August during the main Seatrout run.

Lower Tindal: Lower Tindal runs for 2 miles and is a very attractive length of water set in a wooded gorge with numerous white water streams over rock into deep long pools. The left bank is all woodland and kept quiet as a conservation area. This is a beat for the able-bodied but well worth the effort.

Ford: This beat lies near Ford Village and runs for over 1 mile upstream of Ford Bridge. Fishing is allowed from both banks where woodland areas permit. There are several streams near the bottom of the beat, further upstream the pools are long and flow at a slower pace. 12 pools make up the beat, some of these pools stretch for 200-300 yards.

 

Published in What to do

Set in a hollow at the top of the hill to the east of Ford village, with stunning views over the Till Valley and the Cheviots, Ford Moss is an area of wild landscape, exciting flora and fauna, and historical remains of an abandoned mining community.  

Ford Moss extends to over 60 hectares (150 acres). It is an area of bog and scrub known as a lowland raised mire. A deep layer of peat, formed by rotting vegetation over many thousands of years, overlies the carboniferous limestone bedrock.  Seams of coal were mined on the site from the late 18th to the early 20th century. Ford Moss has become increasingly more dry over the last 250 years mainly through human activity (mining, afforestation and associated drainage).

The bog plant communities in this area include the aromatic Bog Myrtle, while the adjacent woodland contains mature Scots Pine and Oak trees. The Moss is also of interest for its wildlife, the site being home to common lizards and occasional adders as well as birds such as red grouse, woodcock and snipe. Buzzards and kestrels are also often seen above the reserve.

Because of its special characteristics, Ford Moss was notified in 1968 as a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) and further classified by the European Union as a Special Area of Conservation (SAC) in 2000. Ford & Etal Estates work closely with Natural England and the National Wildlife Trust to promote positive management of the reserve. The aim is to maintain the conservation interest, principally by reducing the amount of water run-off through a series of small dams on the bog surface. This has retained the mire community.

Ford Moss is dangerous to walk on. Its boggy surface is very soft and treacherous. However, a circular path of 2 miles allows visitors to walk right around the area and gives excellent views of the surrounding countryside as well as the Moss itself.

Park on the road side by the main entrance gate and please wear appropriate clothes and footwear. A seasonal toilet is located 300m further along the tarmac road behind the small stone building.

Dog-friendly (please keep dogs on leads).

Published in What to do

There are Churches in Ford, Etal, Branxton and Crookham.  These historic and beautiful churches are open to visitors and also welcome worshippers at their Sunday services.

Published in Churches

The archaeological remains of the former colliery at Ford Moss are an iconic feature of the landscape.  Known to have been active from the 17th century, the coal mine largely operated along the northern and western edges of Ford Moss, where the ruin of an old engine house and a large brick chimney are the most obvious features.

The mine closed in 1918, but several of the miners who lived and worked at Ford Moss colliery in the late 19th century were depicted by Louisa Lady Waterford in her famous paintings on the walls of the school which she built in Ford. 

A project to record the important social heritage of Ford Moss colliery is currently under way, in connection with the Lady Waterford Hall.  

For access details go to Ford Moss Nature Reserve.

Published in What to do

Fancy something a bit more adventurous?

Active4seasons has been running guided trips and training in the area for the last 17 years and has fully qualified and insured instructors to make sure you are safe and have fun. Open canoe trips on the River Till or Tweed, rock climbing on the local sandstone crags, sea kayaking along the fantastic Northumberland/Berwickshire coast – book early to avoid disappointment.

Made to measure adventures can also be booked if you want something for your own family or group of friends.  From beginners to experts, there is something to suit you!  

Pre-booking essential - phone evenings between 6 & 7 pm or e-mail anytime.

Published in What to do

High quality horses and ponies suitable for all ages and levels of expertise are available.

Hack out along quiet country lanes, across moorland, through grass fields and woodlands, or take an excursion to the beach and hills.

All the family can enjoy the experience of riding together. Booking is advisable but the visitor is welcome to come along and see the horses and ponies. The Riding Centre is situated on a farm one mile from Ford Village.

There is also a comfortable three bedroom self catering cottage for family holidays.

Please call for details.

Published in What to do

Located at the edge of the village of Milfield, the trail depicts life in the Cheviot Hills from the dawn of time showing man’s occupation through the ages.

A full-scale reproduction of a Stone Age wooden henge, an exact copy of one of the many wooden henges that stood on the landscape some 4300 years ago, is the focal point of this trail which comprises a short walk with information boards along the way.  There is also a Dark Age hut which visitors can explore by collecting a key from nearby Cafe Maelmin (in Milfield village).  A free information brochure is also available at the Cafe.

Published in What to do

The Blue Bell Inn, Crookham, is set in some of North East England's most spectacular countryside. Sit back, warm up by the wood burning stove and enjoy a traditional country pub at its best.


Choose from our selection of guest ales, delicious wines, malt whiskies and local gins, while our talented chefs cook you up some good quality homemade food, with locally sourced ingredients.


Why not stay a few days and discover what Northumberland has to offer? Relax in one of our comfortable rooms or holiday cottage and enjoy The Blue Bell hospitality to its fullest.

Published in Eat

John & Lorna Speight - Papercut Artist and Jewellery Maker

John and Lorna started their individual businesses in North Northumberland over 20 years ago and returned to the area in 2017, opening a new workshop and retail outlet in the old drying kiln directly opposite Heatherslaw Mill.  Combining traditional methods with contemporary design, both John's papercut silhouettes and Lorna's hand-made jewellery make ideal gifts.

Watch John at work as he cuts his designs, each one unique, and browse his range of silhouettes which include framed and unframed pictures of animals, trees, places, views, sport and many other subjects.

Lorna's "Spirit of Colour" jewellery features a fabulous array of colour, shapes and sizes and uses semi-precious stones, glass and charms.  A wide selection of earrings, necklaces and bracelets are on sale.

Whether looking for an unusual and distinctive present or a treat for yourself, John and Lorna offer a vast choice of designs from which you can choose.

** Dogs welcome **

 

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